Cave de Tain Cooperative Collines Rhodaniennes Syrah 89 pts. $12

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A floral Syrah if I’ve ever smelled one, honeysuckle, violets; the nose is just gorgeous. There’s a meaty funkiness there too, with all that savory olive that I so adore in cool-climate Syrah. The ’15’s coming out of the Northern Rhone are a force to be reckoned with, buy, buy, buy, even these less expensive versions. This Syrah is probably made from the leftovers of the ’15 vintage and even it is good.

I haven’t exactly heard rave reviews of the cooperative of Tain L’Hermitage before.  From what I understand they are basically a group of winemakers who make wine from some of the lesser vineyards around Hermitage and not much of it is usually good.  2015 is one of the better vintages in the history of the Northern Rhone so it’s like that one vintage in Napa where there was such a surplus of good wine that even Charles Shaw was kinda good.

 
So get some 2015 Northern Rhone Syrah

The 2014 syrahs from Oregon’s twill cellars

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The Oregon Syrah although it comes off as a bit oaky at first, given time in bottle is a Syrah with high-toned fresh strawberry and plum aromas mixed with salty black olives. On the palate it’s all smoky and structured acidity with a fairly tannic bite reminiscent of a Northern Rhone Syrah. 94 pts
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The Applegate Syrah has even more of a cool-climate bent to it. It’s all kalamata olive and red plum with even more lift and acidity. The palate is a tad lighter and very Northern Rhone in style. There’s sort of an umami flavor to it also that reminds me of soy or a meaty sauce. Less tannin on the finish makes this a very elegant Syrah. 94 pts

Both these wines are aged in neutral oak, see minimal punchdowns, ambient yeast and were processed whole cluster.

I first had Chris Dickson’s Syrahs last year when he sent them along and I was impressed. They seem to take some time to open as they come off as rather one note at first. But when they open up they are special wines, especially for cool-climate Syrah aficionados. They are bright and savory and they are wonderful examples of what Syrah is capable of in Oregon.

Chris sees the 2014 vintage as producing a stylistically tannic and more structured wine than the 2013 vintage which he sees as more of St. Joseph in style. Perhaps the dryness of the vintage and the heat of the summer produced especially concentrated grapes. No late rain events swelled the berries and the skins maintained their tannin in the resulting wines. I don’t find the tannins to be overly present but some time in bottle would definitely result in a more cohesive wine.

It was a pleasure to check in on the 2014 vintage of Twill cellars. This continues to be one of my favorite Syrah producers out of Oregon and I look forward to seeing how they grow.

 

These wines were provided as samples for the purposes of review.

Two Chilean Syrahs from Montes

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2012 Montes Alpha 91 pts. $17. Classic warmer climate Syrah aromas of bacon fat and smokey umami. There’s blueberry and blackberry but damn is it meaty. This is a big wine, and at the first opening I was worried it would be too oaky but given a little time in bottle the wine turns into a very good Syrah. It’s complex with just the right amount of weirdness. It reminds me of some of the better eastern Washington Syrahs I’ve had where, sure, it’s ripe but it’s interesting enough to maintain some varietal character.

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2012 Montes Folly 88 pts. $90: Again there’s that similar complexity, almost a “greeness” and a meatiness that underlies the wine. As far as fruit goes, it’s mostly a blackberry jam kinda thing going on. I wish it wasn’t 15.8% (!) abv because there’s a lot to like here on the nose but the palate gets a little blown out by all the alcohol.

The Montes Folly bills itself as Chile’s first ultra-premium Syrah made from fruit from steep slopes in the inland reaches of the Colchagua Valley. I think Chile has a ton of potential for making Syrah and I can see that there’s a good Syrah in here somewhere but unfortunately, for my palate, it’s just too hot of a wine. There’s certainly a market for these types of Syrahs, it’s just not me.

The regular under $20 Syrah is more my speed, it’s got some solid cool-climate character to balance its ripeness and for around $20 it’s a screaming value.

Montes has been around since 1987 and was one of the early wineries to show that clean and modern wines could be made in Chile.

These wines were provided as samples for the purposes of review.

2011 Crozes-Hermitage Alain Graillot 94 pts. $39

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A distinctive savory and earthy Syrah with aromas of mushroom soup and roasted vegetables. There’s some aromas of plum fruit here too but it falls into the background behind all that savory. The palate is super-minerally and fresh with some fairly intense tannin. A fabulous example of Syrah, if not a tad rustic. Perhaps it will mellow with a little more age and certainly it has the structure to last for a very long time. 94 pts
This is the best Crozes-Hermitage wines I’ve had. The Croze-Hermitage appellation generally is seen as a lesser appellation than the other Northern Rhone designations and deservedly so. The wines are generally less interesting and come from mostly flat plains and less-distinct soil types that surround the famed hill of Hermitage. But some producers, like Graillot, challenge the traditional paradigm by making distinctive wines that as, you can tell from the tasting notes above, embody Syrah from the Northern Rhone River Valley

Two well done $20 Syrahs from distant locales.

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Elephant Hill: Floral, plum, under-ripe blackberry, mostly a savory, meaty, tarry Syrah, which makes it up my alley. Great acidity, some new oak is coming through and not exactly integrated at the moment. Crunchy acidity makes it a wine that could go great with many types of food. Sweet tannins on the finish make it an easy wine to appreciate. 90 points

Elephant Hill is a Hawke’s Bay label, their Syrah is a blend of Syrah from their three vineyard sites: The inland Gimblett Gravels, Te Awanga, and Triangle vineyards.

New Zealand Syrahs, when made with a minimum of new oak, continue to impress me not only for their price point but also for their cool-climate character.

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Villa Pillo: A meaty, salty nose, fresh fruit aromas there too, with a distinct background note of currant. There’s something licorice-y in it that makes it seem Italian to me but it definitely has a Syrah nose. Nice acid, it’s a well made wine, balanced and delicious with an acid lift on the finish. There’s tannin there, for sure, but it’s not overwhelmingly mouth drying. 92 points

An Italian Syrah from the heart of Chianti? Yes, not your everyday occurrence but this one is stellar.

Two Vintages of Belharra Las Madres Carneros Syrah

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Belharra 2013 Syrah Carneros Sonoma Valley 2013 (sold out but some magnums available)

Plum, chocolate, mostly a fruity, not a lot of savory but a little black olive comes through with some time in the glass, not too much oak, a bit of heat coming through on the nose. Decent acidity on the mid-palate. A little spike of alcohol on the finish but it blows off with time. A big Syrah for sure but it reveals a little of the cool vineyard character of black olive brine and pepper. 90 pts Aged in neutral oak, no stem inclusion 15% ABV 50 cases produced

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Belharra 2014 Carneros Sonoma County $39

Stewed fruit aromas, almost a liqueur-like nose. Again, good notes of olive and a little more red fruit character than the 2013. Not exactly a super bright Syrah but I’m trying to branch out to appreciate bigger and richer Syrahs and this one is a good introduction. There’s freshness to the palate and the new oak isn’t distracting. My favorite of the two.  91 pts. Aged in 20% new oak in puncheons, no stem inclusion. 109 cases produced.

Belharra Wines is the project of Anne Fogerty and Camille Gaio. Both have other jobs in Napa while they search out vineyard sites from surrounding areas that allow them to launch their own brand. Fogerty is the cellar master for Outpost Winery on Howell Mountain in Napa Valley. Gaio is the assistant winemaker for Julien Fayard in Napa.

Gaio is an avid surfer and Fogerty says that the surfing analogy of waiting for a big wave works well for how they treat the growth of the winery; they are waiting for the next big vineyard opportunity to come along and when it does they’ll be ready for it. In the meantime the winery sources their current wines from Las Madres in Carneros and a Chardonnay vineyard in Knight’s Valley. They also make an outstanding rosé from Las Madres fruit.

Las Madres is a special site and I was fortunate enough in Spring of 2014 to get invited to a tasting of all the winemakers who make wine from the Las Madres. Belharra impressed me at that tasting. You can read more about the vineyard here but suffice it to say, the vineyard makes a strong case for Carneros being a great spot for Syrah in the future. There are only two pick dates (except for the rosé pick) for Las Madres so wineries have a little less control over their own destiny but most of the wines I’ve tried from Las Madres have an olive brine character that comes through along with some savory and meaty notes.

It was a pleasure to taste the wines and I thank Anne Fogerty and Camille Gaio for sending them along. I look forward to hearing more from these two in the future.

These wines were provided as samples for the purposes of review.