Domaine Marc Sorrel Hermitage

After a few fits and starts in France, specifically a sadly missed meeting with Domaine Clape, we were relieved to find Marc Sorrel’s cellars in the town of Tain L’ Hermitage rather easily. His little winery even had a sign in front (which is not as common as you would think in the Northern Rhone region of France), and he spoke English which made my wife happy as she did not have to attempt to translate.

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Monsieur Sorrel comes from a long line of public notaries in the village of Tain. He studied to be a notary and ended up becoming one for a short period until his father’s death. His father and grandfather had owned parts of Le Meal vineyard and some of Bessards and Les Plantiers and his father began making small amounts of wine in the 1970s. Marc Sorrel took over operations in 1984. He was also able to add the Greffieux vineyard in the mid 1980s by purchasing it on his own. He’s a bit reserved but opens up quickly and it’s easy to tell he has a lot of quiet pride in his winery and confidence in the quality of his wines.

Sorrel makes wine in a traditional way with a few nods towards modernity, he uses no new oak, generally 100% whole cluster (depending on the maturity of the stems) and ages his wines for two years in barrel. Yet, he uses outside yeasts and an automatic punchdown machine, which he’s quite excited about. He’s one of the small producers, a little island in an appellation dominated by Jaboulet, Chapoutier. and Guigal. In fact, according to Monsieur Sorrel only about a dozen producers make wine outside of the three big ones and they make it in small quantities. Hermitage is, after all, a small appellation.

Marc Sorrel talking about his punchdown machine and the barrel room which, rather than being downstairs, extends back from the tasting room/store front. 

Monsieur Sorrel makes a cuvee that he simply calls Hermitage Rouge ($55). Traditionally most Hermitage Syrahs were blends from various vineyards and this is still widely practiced today. The 2013 cuvee tastes of honest pure fruit with good balance and a backbone of acidity.

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The Greal ($85), so called because it is a combination of the Greffieux vineyard and the Méal vineyard, is his flagship red. It’s a richer style of Syrah and seems darker and fuller than the Hermitage Rouge but also defined by its core of pure fresh fruit.

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Monsieur Sorrel also makes a beautiful white Hermitage from Les Rocoules which is spectacularly rich and complex and a wine that I’d love to taste in 10 to 15 years.

These are impressive iterations of Hermitage. Although I would have loved to have purchased a Greal (and I’m still kicking myself for not having done so), I decided on an Hermitage Rouge and plan on putting it away for a few years to revisit and enjoy.

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