Domaine Durand 2012 Saint Joseph Les Coteaux and Domaine Durand 2012 Prémices Cornas: Recommended

Domaine Durand has been around since 1996 when two brothers teamed up to take over their father’s estate. Their St. Joseph comes from steep vineyards near the village of Chateaubourg. All the grapes are de-stemmed and macerate in concrete vats for a length of time decided by the quality of the vintage. Most of the wines are made with native yeasts and are aged for about a year in large oak casks and a smaller percentage aged in concrete. The Domaine is made up of two brothers: Eric and Joel. Most of their Cornas plantings (at least for the Prémices) are from the late 1990s, with a few dating back to 1994. Eric and Joel make their Syrah in a style that is meant to drink young, due to the fact that they are working with younger vines.

Durand st. joseph

2012 Domaine Durand Saint Joseph $30

Perfumed honeysuckle/rose/violet nose with hints of pepper and gravel. Pure, balanced, fresh on the mid palate with sweet plum, black pepper and good lift but not overly tannic on the finish. This is what St. Joseph should be, food friendly and not too in your face with the tannins. Just pure pleasure to drink but with enough complexity and energy to make it interesting. And the price isn’t bad either.

Durand Cornas

2012 Prémices Cornas $30

This wine was surprisingly open and full with beautiful sweet floral aromas. It also has that salted plum aroma that I can’t get enough of in cool-climate Syrah. There isn’t much savory on the nose but the fruit aromas are fresh smelling. I was also surprised by the richness on the palate and even got a hint of heat on the back end, with some rich oak mixed in. Not as tannic as I would have expected for a young Cornas. It’s a very enticing wine but perhaps a little too open and rich for my palate. I have to admit the bottle went pretty quickly though, so it’s hard to find anything to seriously complain about. I let this hang out on the counter overnight and it had more savory elements and the acidity seemed higher than the night before. It might be a good indication of where the wine is heading. It’s hard to conceive that a Cornas could be available for this modest price and I can only imagine it’s because the Cornas vines they are using are relatively young (for Cornas) so they aren’t charging the same that an older vine expert like Clape is. They also make the wine in a style that emphasizes fruit and is meant to drink young.

These are great wines that don’t break the bank. As I mentioned, these are not the rustic, classic styles of Northern Rhone Syrah that I generally like the most but they are delicious, fun wines to drink and more than accessible even at their young age.

Thanks again to my indispensable copy of John Livingston-Learmonth’s exhaustive text, The Wines of the Northern Rhone for helping me with this post.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s